in Social Media

Most Entrepreneurs Suck at Giving Advice

psychiatristEntrepreneurs love to give advice.  I’ve learned the hard way that you should probably ignore that advice.

When an entrepreneur, even especially successful ones gives you advice, what usually happens is they’ll take a quick look at your business and tell you what they think you should do.  They have all good intentions and they really do think that it’s in your best interest.

The problem is that they have extremely limited context.  The advice they’re giving you is what worked for them in the past.  We’ve all had specific tactics that have worked really well for us in the past.  Naturally, when people ask for help, we want to give them advice based on things that worked for us.  If something didn’t work, why would we recommend it to you?

Here’s the problem…

Just because it worked for them, doesn’t mean it will work for you. You have a different product, audience and brand.  Even if they’re all very similar, you’re doing it at a different time.

There’s a good chance that it’s actually really bad advice for your specific situation because it will take away your focus on what matters.

The best mentors I’ve had won’t just shell out advice like candy.  They’ll spend most of the time learning about the company and the problem at hand, then they’ll talk through possible solutions with me.  They make sure they understand the full context before giving advice.

That’s why psychiatrists will spend the majority of the time asking questions.  It gives them context into the real problem, and by making you talk through it there’s a good chance you’ll come to your own conclusions.

Even still, there’s a good chance it will be bad advice.  The reality is, no one knows in the intricacies of your business as well as you do.  There are times when having a fresh perspective can be useful.  And any advice can always inspire an idea.  But it’s easy to fall into the trap of believing that all advice is good advice if it’s coming from someone who has proven to be successful.

That’s just not the case.

Here’s my advice (which you should probably ignore):

Listen to all advice.

Let it inspire you.

Don’t assume it’s good.

Actually, assume it’s bad.

Ignore bad advice.

Do what makes sense for your specific problem.

If you’re stuck, ask for advice.

Rinse and repeat.

And if you’re a mentor, focus on asking the right questions instead of trying to find the solution yourself.

  • DavidSpinks

    rrhoover thanks man (=

  • ianhunter

    Quibb DavidSpinks it’s great to get some external feedback, but never stop listening to your own internal sense of “up”

    • DavidSpinks

      ianhunter your gut is your best advisor (= Quibb

    • DavidSpinks

      ianhunter your gut is your best advisor (= Quibb

    • DavidSpinks

      ianhunter your gut is your best advisor (= Quibb

  • ianhunter

    Quibb DavidSpinks it’s great to get some external feedback, but never stop listening to your own internal sense of “up”

  • nuevastribus

    FkieCarrero varisb Quizás. Pero los mejores consejos son los de los que han pasado por ello y saben comunicar.

    • varisb

      nuevastribus FkieCarrero El principal problema es que aunque hayamos pasado por ello, siempre contamos todo desde nuestra experiencia…

    • varisb

      nuevastribus FkieCarrero …y cada startup es un mundo.Cada startup ha triunfado por cosas diferentes y no hay consejos que sirvan para todo

      • nuevastribus

        varisb FkieCarrero Seguro. Más en sectores de mucha innovación. Pero hay muchos errores de base que se repiten demasiado.

      • nuevastribus

        varisb FkieCarrero Seguro. Más en sectores de mucha innovación. Pero hay muchos errores de base que se repiten demasiado.

      • nuevastribus

        varisb FkieCarrero Y muchas ideas innovadoras que se pueden aplicar a negocios impensables. Eso me gusta mucho. Reinventar conceptos.

      • FkieCarrero

        varisb nuevastribus La experiencia te ayuda a aumentar la probabilidad de éxito, pero no es un seguro para ti, así que menos para otros.

        • josek_net

          FkieCarrero Las empresas que mejor han funcionado son disruptivas al 100% y siguiendo consejos no hay disrupción varisb nuevastribus

        • nuevastribus

          josek_net FkieCarrero varisb Muy pocas. La mayoría solo han dado un pequeño salto. Con mucho acierto. Como brainsins_es o SinDelantal

        • nuevastribus

          josek_net FkieCarrero varisb Muy pocas. La mayoría solo han dado un pequeño salto. Con mucho acierto. Como brainsins_es o SinDelantal

        • nuevastribus

          josek_net FkieCarrero varisb Muy pocas. La mayoría solo han dado un pequeño salto. Con mucho acierto. Como brainsins_es o SinDelantal

        • nuevastribus

          josek_net FkieCarrero varisb Por cierto, espero veros mañana en la presentación del Libro de los emprendedores, sois protagonistas

        • nuevastribus

          josek_net FkieCarrero varisb con digitalmeteo BereCasillas JMLOZM mipuf ticketea loogic RCarpintier diegocoquillat y muchos más..

        • varisb

          nuevastribus josek_net FkieCarrero Me encantaría poder ir! Pero estoy ahora mismo en México!! 🙁

      • FkieCarrero

        varisb nuevastribus La experiencia te ayuda a aumentar la probabilidad de éxito, pero no es un seguro para ti, así que menos para otros.

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